EU's silence on free transfer of Russian fertilizers to developing countries 'height of cynicism:' Putin
WORLD ECONOMY

EU's silence on free transfer of Russian fertilizers to developing countries 'height of cynicism:' Putin

Sanctions imposed by Western states have negative effects both on themselves, poorest countries, says Russian president

News Service AA

The EU's refusal to respond to Russia's proposal to transfer 300,000 tons of fertilizers from the European ports to developing countries free of charge is the "height of cynicism," the Russian president said on Tuesday.

"It is clear that they do not want to let our companies earn. But we want to give it away for free, at least give it away for free to countries in need. No, and there's no answer to that," Vladimir Putin said at a ceremony for ambassadors from 24 countries to present their credentials.

The Russian leader stressed that the sanctions imposed by the Western states have a negative effect both on themselves and on the poorest countries.

He went on to say that it was the developing and poorest countries that were primarily affected by the Western restrictions on the supply of Russian energy, food, and fertilizers to world markets.

On the recent tensions between Armenia and Azerbaijan, Putin said any conflict between "the countries close to us" causes "serious concern."

"We call on everyone to show restraint, strictly adhere to the cease-fire and firmly follow the tripartite statements of the leaders of Russia, Azerbaijan, and Armenia," he added.

Putin underlined that through the Collective Security Treaty Organization, measures are being taken to reduce the tension between Armenia and Azerbaijan.

Azerbaijan and Armenia recently reached a cease-fire following border clashes that claimed lives on both sides.

Relations between the former Soviet republics have been tense since 1991, when the Armenian military occupied Nagorno-Karabakh, a territory internationally recognized as part of Azerbaijan.

Baku liberated several cities, villages, and settlements from Armenian occupation during new 44-day clashes in the 2020 fall, which ended after a Moscow-brokered truce. The peace agreement is celebrated as a triumph in Azerbaijan.

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